Resources

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Requirement in Washington State
WCSAP Webpage
November, 2013

Are you aware that the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries (L&I) requires you to have either a

  • safety committee
  • or a regular safety meeting,

depending on the number of employees you have? WAC 296-800-130 clearly identifies this requirement.

If you have 11 or more employees on the same shift in the same location, you must establish a safety committee, which consists of representatives elected by employees as…

Topic
  • Nonprofit Governance
How to Terminate an Employee the Right Way
WCSAP Webpage
September, 2013

Terminating an employee is usually at the top of a manager's "Things I Hate to Do" list. Many sexual assault programs have a "family" feel to them, and it's tough to come to a parting of the ways within a close-knit organization. Nonetheless, no one benefits when you continue to hold onto an employee who is not fulfilling job requirements, who is too burned-out to function, or whose toxic attitude is damaging the organization as a whole. When the time comes to say goodbye, there are some…

Topic
  • Supervision
WCSAP Webpage
January, 2013

When you have a staff member who has a negative attitude and doesn't really seem to care about the work, the first thing that comes to mind is "burnout." However, it is important to distinguish whether the attitude and behavior is a result of vicarious trauma — the changes in a person's inner experience that come about because of handling an overload of other people's traumatic experiences — or burnout, which is dissatisfaction with the job itself. In either case, it is important to assess…

Topic
  • Supervision
WCSAP Webpage
October, 2012

Have you ever wondered whether it was okay to include a portion of someone else's work on your website, in your training curriculum, in a community presentation, or in a publication? Have you had concerns about protecting work that your organization has developed? These are important issues, and a little basic knowledge about intellectual property rights will be helpful to any manager in the nonprofit field. As a manager, you will want to ensure that you inform others about policies and laws…

Topic
  • Nonprofit Governance
WCSAP Webpage
June, 2012

As a Community Sexual Assault Program manager, you are subject to a formal evaluation process by your supervisor, whether that is the Board, an Executive Director (if you do not also fill that role), or someone else. However, most of us really want to know how we are doing at our jobs — and for managers, that means getting feedback from those who are supervised as well as those who supervise us. How do you get feedback from your staff in an appropriate manner without having them feel like…

Topic
  • Supervision
WCSAP Webpage
March, 2012

The annual performance review can be an excellent opportunity to work individually with staff members to enhance their skills and abilities as well as their job satisfaction. Some managers (and some employees) dread performance reviews, seeing them as the venue for telling unwelcome truths. Done properly, however, these meetings can enhance your relationships with staff and volunteers.

  • There should not be any surprises. Performance problems should be…
Topic
  • Supervision
WCSAP Webpage
January, 2012

Those in the non-profit field work hard to keep or expand funding sources in order to offer more to their community. Expanding primary prevention services can benefit the whole community though! Here are some highlights of funding sources out there and tips for writing those funding requests!

Finding Funding

Close to Home

  • A community free of sexual assault benefits everyone, so talk to community organizations about how they can support…
Topic
  • Grants & Finances
PDF & Printed Materials
January, 2012

Service providers from all disciplines — medical and mental health, law enforcement, the courts, education, child welfare, and advocacy — can offer trauma-informed services to those they serve. Trauma-informed services approach people from the standpoint of the question "What has happened to you?" rather than "What is wrong with you?" It is important to note that providing trauma-informed services does not mean service providers must determine exactly what has happened to an individual.…

Topic
  • Trauma
  • Program Provision
WCSAP Webpage
April, 2011

Sexual assault program managers are drawn to the coaching model of supervision because it is in line with the values we have in our field. The coaching approach is attractive because:

  • it is strengths-based
  • it is based on respect for staff members
  • it encourages professional growth and development

When we coach, we listen more than we talk, we facilitate rather than control, and we work with staff members to come up with…

Topic
  • Supervision
For an "Energized, Incredible" Board
WCSAP Webpage
April, 2011

Each member of your Board of Directors has accepted crucial responsibilities for the welfare of your agency, and needs training of the highest possible quality to carry out those responsibilities. The Office of Crime Victims Advocacy (OCVA) Accreditation Standards state:

Each member of the governing board or advisory committee for a sexual assault program must have orientation and training specific to their role.

The suggestions below are relevant…

Topic
  • Nonprofit Governance
PDF
March, 2011

Some highlights of this issue:

  • An interview with disaster sociologist Dr. Elaine Enarson
  • Interviews and articles from managers of sexual assault programs across Washington State - snapshots of what is really happening in the field
  • A disaster recovery guide
  • An article on disability considerations
  • An emergency planning fact sheet
  • A checklist of strategies you can use to create your emergency plans and recovery…
Topic
  • Planning
PDF
August, 2009

Executive Summary

In 1997, Washington State developed its first sexual violence prevention plan. The plan focused on changing the conditions that cause sexual violence. In 2008, the state began the process of revising the plan. Like the 1997 plan, this new plan emphasizes meaningful change rather than symptoms. Both plans view community development as a lever for change.

The Washington State Department of Health and the…

Topic
  • Planning
  • Strategies
WCSAP Webpage

Community Sexual Assault Programs (CSAPs) in Washington State receive their funding through the Office of Crime Victims Advocacy (OCVA). Every four years, each CSAP undergoes a rigorous accreditation process, whereby they are audited by an outside agency to ensure that sexual assault survivors have access to quality services across the state.

OCVA is responsible…

Topic
  • Accreditation
WCSAP Webpage

Forms for Sexual Assault Programs

Limited Release of Information Forms - These forms were created by Julie Field, founder of The Confidentiality Institute and the Safety Net Project, National Network of Domestic Violence. (2008, last revised 2010). They can be downloaded and modified to include your agency information.

Topic
  • Management
WCSAP Webpage

WCSAP provides technical assistance on nonprofit management and organizational development issues to WCSAP member programs, other allied organizations, and statewide sexual assault coalitions across the nation. WCSAP strives to build the capacity of organizations to operate effectively to prevent sexual violence and to serve all victims. We provide specific technical assistance to help Community Sexual Assault Programs in Washington State to meet the accreditation requirements of the Office…

Topic
  • Management